Friday, July 30, 2010

Mr. Integrity

I'm a golfer. My husband taught me to golf back when we were dating and I realized that if I didn't learn to golf, I'd never see him on a Saturday. I'm not fantastic. But I'm decent. I can hold my own. On occasion I out-drive the boys or birdie a hole that the others have only parred. I like to golf. In fact, I love to golf. Watching golf, on the other hand, has never been my cup of tea. And I'm pretty sure it isn't a cup of tea very many people out there enjoy.

But in April an event took place on the golf course that I think everyone needs to be aware of. It was an event that kind of changed the way I look at humanity. And certainly at professional golf.

Brian Davis. A British golfer who had never won a tournament, was neck and neck with Jim Furyk, a golfer with many wins under his belt. On the first hole of the playoff to win the tournament, Brian Davis took a swing that got him within distance of tying the hole and continue the playoff. But shortly after making that swing, Brian Davis called over an official and told the official that he thought he had committed a penalty. On his backswing, he said, he thought he saw his club brush a reed. This is, officially, against the rules. The club can't move any "impediment" on the back swing. No one saw it. No one had called him on it. Even on video replay, the tiny movement of the reed could only be seen in slow motion. But the reed had moved. And Brian was forced to take a 2-stroke penalty, forfeiting the game.

What is amazing here is that a man had so much on the line--his first tour win, over $1 million dollars in prize money--but he chose his honor, his integrity, his name as more important. He could have let the error go. Probably no one would have ever noticed. But HE noticed, and so he had to speak up.

There are a lot of names in golf that come and go. A few that stick in our minds for their greatness. A few that stick for their folly. But Brian Davis, a nearly unknown name in the world of golf, will always be remembered because of this day. He is an example to me. Something to set my honesty watch by. Thank you, Mr.Davis. You are a true hero.


Link to the article here

10 comments:

just call me jo said...

I heart honesty! Especially when it exposes flaws during crucial times. Here, here, Mr. Davis.

Kristina P. said...

This is a great lesson.

Charlie said...

Wow, that's intense. Go Davis!

jennie w. said...

What do you expect? He's a Davis!

alex dumas said...

That's cool.

L. said...

That is just plain astonishing! And yes, his integrity will be remembered as long as Tiger Woods lack of integrity (on the home front)

Mia said...

This got me choked up when I read it and then again when we were eating dinner (out) when I tried to retell the story to my husband! Amazing!

Nicki said...

It's so refreshing to hear that there are still really good people out there, especially athletes. Thanks for sharing!

Teachinfourth said...

Isn't it amazing that our actions speak so much louder than our words… thank heaven for good examples.

Amy said...

I think I saw a movie like that once staring this crazy but hot scientologist.